Continuous Chain Motor and Speed Control

The electric motor of direct current operates the essentially constant current and the level of this current is determined by the load on the shaft. The motor has the possibility to drive the load, having a constant torque at any established rotation.
After the nominal speed, the speed control in the electric motor of direct current is done with the variation of the flow and keeping the tension of armor constant. This is called field weakening zone.
SealMaster ERX-PN20
To increase the speed of the motor, simply reduce the flux and the armature current will rise so as to produce the total torque needed by the load. This conjugate develops the speed of the machine and the electromotive force also increases. The transient current falls to a point of equilibrium, which corresponds to the conservation of the torque required by the load. During the accelerations caused by the increase in voltage, the current rises to cause the electric motor to accelerate, and then returns to its original value.
The torque can be any one up to the limit of the nominal value, but corresponds to a nominal armature current, defined by thermal aspects of motor design.

Continuous Chain Motor and Speed Control